Selling tinted glasses suitable for visual stress & dyslexia, providing a great alternative to overlays.
Available in multiple sizes from …
‎Teenager/small adult Glasses · ‎Children’s Glasses

Dyslexia Glasses your Coloured Lenses

As an alternative to coloured overlays, you can use prescribed tinted lenses in glasses (with or without a prescription).

These will provide a precise and accurate colour tailored specifically for you which can be much more convenient for you especially if you work on a computer.

Again your optician will be able to determine the most effective colour match during your dyslexic test. 

It’s important to note that the colour of the precision tinting can be different for the cerium coloured overlays so you cannot have your lenses tinted to the same colour you have your overlays as this will have little benefit.

We don’t have Precision Tinted Lenses available on our website yet but if you know the exact colour you want call 01268 777729 and we can order them for you

Dyslexia Explained

Dyslexia is a learning difficulty that primarily affects the skills involved in accurate and fluent word reading and spelling.

Characteristic features of dyslexia are difficulties in phonological awareness (identifying sounds in words), verbal memory, and verbal processing speed.

Dyslexia occurs across the range of intellectual abilities.

It is best thought of as a ‘continuum’ i.e. not a distinct category of symptoms because there are no clear cut-off points.

Someone with dyslexia may also have difficulties with language, motor coordination, mental calculation, concentration, and personal organisation, but these are not, by themselves, markers of dyslexia.

The British Dyslexia Association estimates that around 10 percent of the UK’s population is dyslexic, it is more common in boys than girls.

Dyslexia is a lifelong condition but, with support, it can be managed.

How does dyslexia affect vision?

Dyslexia makes it difficult for a person to process information they hear and see.

While those with phonological dyslexia will struggle to repeat rhymes and sequences they have heard, visual dyslexia will impact how they see words and letters.

Dyslexics will therefore put a lot of stress on their eyes trying to focus on what they are reading.

As part of the diagnosis of dyslexia, it is important to rule out visual problems and to treat them where necessary.

What is visual dyslexia?

Visual dyslexia is a catch-all phrase for people who have difficulty reading as a result of the incorrect processing of visual information received by the brain.

This could be made worse as a result of a physical problem with the eyes, for example being long or short-sighted or as a result of binocular vision anomalies i.e. problems with your eyes working together.

In many cases, the brain struggles to process visual information more in different levels of brightness or using different colour contrasts

In some cases, an inability to process visual information and the tendency to stare harder can result in blurred or double vision and generally tired eyes.

Glasses, contact lenses, or eye exercises can help alleviate physical problems with vision.

This can help children to overcome dyslexia symptoms by reducing any other strain on the eyes.

Visual dyslexia symptoms

Visual dyslexia often mimics the symptoms of vision loss, so it can be hard to detect at first. It’s also hard for a child who has been dyslexic from birth to accurately describe what they see because, to them, it is normal.

Physical symptoms:

Such as rubbing eyes, blinking lots, squinting, difficulty in bright lights, headaches/migraines, tired eyes, sensitivity to screens, motion sickness, and general balance and coordination problems. 

Reading problems:

This includes missing words when reading out loud, letters that move or disappear from the page, blurry words both near and far, transposing letters – such as reading ‘tip’ for ‘pit’.

Can you get glasses for dyslexia?

If the dyslexia is caused by, or made worse, by problems with vision then yes, glasses or contact lenses would help. For some people certain tints on glasses can also help make it easier to read – the colour and density of the tint will vary from person to person.

 Our dyslexia specialist will be able to advise other corrective measures such as coloured overlays and certain font types and sizes.

What do dyslexia glasses do?
The use of coloured filters and lenses can alleviate visual distortions for people with dyslexia.
These overlays are simple translucent pieces of plastic that add colour to text.
Get in touch with our expert optometrists
Book Your Dyslexia Glasses Appointment

Dyslexia affects more than just reading and writing, it can somtimes impact your memory, coordination and organisation.

Each person’s experience of dyslexia will be unique.

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design By Nick Templeman

Our team of specialist mobile opticians can come to those who can’t visit us in-store unaccompanied due to a physical or mental illness or disability.


In order to be eligible for a home visit, you or someone you know might:

  • have a condition that stops you from leaving your home unaccompanied due to poor health, or

  • be living with a diagnosed mental health condition that prevents you from leaving your home without the assistance of another person, or

  • be housebound or bedbound due to a physical disability


What do we mean by a physical or mental illness?


There are many conditions and reasons why someone might not able to leave their home unaccompanied. It’s best to talk to us about your situation so we can determine if you do meet the criteria, but to try and help make it a little clearer, here are a few examples. 


Conditions may include (but aren’t limited to):

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dementia
  • Severe arthritis
  • A diagnosed mental illness
  • A condition that affects your mobility
  • A condition that affects your short term memory
  • An illness that requires constant medication (for example, oxygen)
  • A temporary medical reason prohibiting you from leaving your home (such as vertigo)
  • A temporary illness that prevents a person from leaving the home unaccompanied
  • A medical professional has advised you not to leave home without help

Whatever the reason is, if you or someone you know can’t leave the home without the assistance of another person, then get in touch to find out if you’re eligible to have a home eye test.


Who qualifies for a free home eye test?


Those who have a physical or mental illness which prevent you from leaving your home unaccompanied.

Those who are eligible for free NHS-funded eye tests by checking the criteria below.

The majority of our customers qualify for a free NHS-funded eye test. 


See if you do by checking if you meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Aged 60 or over
  • Registered as partially sighted or blind
  • Diagnosed with diabetes or glaucoma
  • Considered to be at risk of glaucoma, as advised by an optician
  • Aged 40 or over and have a family member diagnosed with glaucoma, or have a family history of glaucoma
  • Receiving benefit*
  • Entitled to, or named on, a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate
  • Named on a valid NHS HC2 certificate (full help). Those named on an NHS HC3 certificate (partial help) may also get help with the cost of a private eye test
  • Eligible for an NHS Complex Lens Voucher (your optician will advise on the entitlement)


*You’re also entitled if you or your partner (including civil partner) receive, or you’re under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving: Income Support, Income-related Employment, and Support Allowance, Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.

Our team of specialist mobile opticians can come to those who can’t visit us in store unaccompanied due to a physical or mental illness or disability.

In order to be eligible for a home visit, you or someone you know might:

  • have a condition that stops you from leaving your home unaccompanied due to poor health, or

  • be living with a diagnosed mental health condition that prevents you from leaving your home without the assistance of another person, or

  • be housebound or bedbound due to a physical disability

What do we mean by a physical or mental illness?

There are many conditions and reasons why someone might not able to leave their home unaccompanied. It’s best to talk to us about your situation so we can determine if you do meet the criteria, but to try and help make it a little clearer, here are a few examples. Conditions may include (but aren’t limited to):

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dementia
  • Severe arthritis
  • A diagnosed mental illness
  • A condition that affects your mobility
  • A condition that affects your short term memory
  • An illness that requires constant medication (for example, oxygen)
  • A temporary medical reason prohibiting you from leaving your home (such as vertigo)
  • A temporary illness that prevents a person from leaving the home unaccompanied
  • A medical professional has advised you not to leave home without help

Whatever the reason is, if you or someone you know can’t leave the home without the assistance of another person, then get in touch to find out if you’re eligible to have a home eye test.

Who qualifies for a free home eye test?

Those who have a physical or mental illness which prevents you from leaving your home unaccompanied.

Those who are eligible for free NHS-funded eye test by checking the criteria below.

The majority of our customers qualify for a free NHS-funded eye test. See if you do by checking if you meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Aged 60 or over
  • Registered as partially sighted or blind
  • Diagnosed with diabetes or glaucoma
  • Considered to be at risk of glaucoma, as advised by an optician
  • Aged 40 or over and have a family member diagnosed with glaucoma, or have a family history of glaucoma
  • Receiving benefit*
  • Entitled to, or named on, a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate
  • Named on a valid NHS HC2 certificate (full help). Those named on an NHS HC3 certificate (partial help) may also get help with the cost of a private eye test
  • Eligible for an NHS Complex Lens Voucher (your optician will advise on the entitlement)

*You’re also entitled if you or your partner (including civil partner) receive, or you’re under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving: Income Support, Income-related Employment and Support Allowance, Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.

Who does not qualify for our home visit service?

No matter what condition you have, if you are physically able to leave your home on your own without needing help or assistance of another person, you will not qualify for a free NHS-funded home eye test.

We are also unable to visit patients in hospital.